What Is The Expiration Date On Toothpaste And Does It Matter

The expiration date on your toothpaste is not an indicator of how fresh or effective your toothpaste is. It’s a manufacturer-mandated sticker that’s printed on most tubes of toothpaste and represents the last day users can expect the product to be safe and effective. Experts agree that there’s no reason to panic if you find that your tube of toothpaste has expired. While we don’t have any concrete evidence, it’s likely that this recommendation comes from a mix of common sense and standard practices in the cosmetics industry. Toothpaste manufacturers place an expiration date on their products for two main reasons: as a quality control measure, and to reduce the risk of harmful bacteria growing in a tube once it has been opened. Let’s take a closer look at why manufacturers put an expiration date on their products, what these dates actually mean, and whether or not you should throw away old toothpaste after it expires.

What Does the Expiration Date on Toothpaste Mean?

The date printed on the label of your tube of toothpaste is the last day the manufacturer guarantees the toothpaste will meet certain standards of safety and effectiveness. The FDA requires all toothpaste brands to print an expiration date on the packaging, and manufacturers typically use a two-digit system. For example, you might find a label that says “this product expires 10/19.” This means the toothpaste’s effectiveness is set to expire on October 19. This does not mean that you will stop brushing your teeth on or before October 19. It simply means that the manufacturer no longer guarantees that the toothpaste is safe and effective.

Should You Toss Old Toothpaste?

Unless toothpaste is expired, there’s no reason to throw it away. In fact, we recommend that you don’t follow this advice. While the manufacturer’s expiration date is important, it’s worth noting that they are not legally required to provide a reason why your toothpaste has gone bad. According to the FDA, the manufacturer’s expiration date doesn’t mean that the toothpaste has gone bad or ineffective. It simply means that the product has passed its “best if used by” date. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the toothpaste is expired. It simply means that the manufacturer is no longer able to guarantee that it’s safe and effective.

How to Tell if Your Toothpaste Has Gone Bad?

While there are no definite signs that your toothpaste has gone bad, you can look out for a few key warning signs.

  • If it has a bad smell, it has likely gone bad. 
  • If your toothpaste looks like it’s separating, it has probably expired. 
  • Toothpaste has clumps in it, it has likely gone bad.
  • Changed color.
  • It may also be harder to squeeze out of the tube. 

While these are not definite signs that your toothpaste has gone bad, they are important indicators to pay attention to.

How to Store Toothpaste to Extend its Shelf Life?

Toothpaste should be kept in a cool, dry environment that’s free from humidity and direct sunlight. You should also make sure to keep the lid on your toothpaste when you’re not using it, and don’t leave the product in a place where it might get knocked over or fall off its shelf. With that said, there are no official rules for how long toothpaste should be kept. This is because toothpaste doesn’t have a “best by” date, and manufacturers don’t have to provide an expiration date on their products. While toothpaste does have an expiration date, it’s unlikely that your tube will suddenly become ineffective after the date has passed.

Bottom line

The expiration date on your toothpaste is not an indicator of how fresh or effective your toothpaste is. It’s a manufacturer-mandated sticker that’s printed on most tubes of toothpaste and represents the last day users can expect the product to be safe and effective. Experts agree that there’s no reason to panic if you find that your tube of toothpaste has expired. While we don’t have any concrete evidence, it’s likely that this recommendation comes from a mix of common sense and standard practices in the cosmetics industry.

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